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This forum focuses on the general pros & cons of enlarging representation in the U.S. House of Representatives which are not related to the topics covered in Sections one through ten. No incivility or partisan advocacy allowed.
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TheTrucker
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:30 pm
First Name: Mike
Stance: Pro-Enlargement
Location: Port Orchard, Wa.
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Resolving Bipolar Politics

Post by TheTrucker »

With a larger House membership comes smaller electoral districts that cannot be controlled by centralized authorities. Such districts of smaller constituencies hold the individual representatives accountable for their actions regardless of party affiliation. The candidates are forced to compete on the basis of how well they actually represent the voters. And while the resulting number of factious districts may increase and so too the number of factious representatives, the number of rational districts and rational representatives will far outnumber the factious. There will be districts that are 55% black or 55% Cuban or 55% Latino or 55% moonbat or 55% rightard. But when all districts are considered there will be a majority of the middle. And the middle is what will decide what the "leaders" can and cannot do. With a larger House and smaller districts the parties are forced to the middle much more than now and it becomes a war of education and enlightenment of the masses to see who/what will prevail.

If the wingers (left and right) want to battle then the high schools are the proper ground. There should be requirements for a high school diploma which include civics and classical economics. No calculus, no trig, no chemistry, no algebra 2, and little of the other college prep is needed to vote or to contribute to the society in very meaningful ways. But the people who vote should have an understanding of how their government is designed to work and a basic understanding of math free classical economics. A college education is a fine thing, but it is not essential, nor is it going to be employed by the majority of the people even if it is free. In leaving the K12 people uneducated in the things that really matter we leave them as easy prey for those who would lie to them. This is the worry some of us have concerning an increase in democracy. But we must take the opportunity we have at present to increase the level of representation even _before_ or even _as_ we increase the level of basic education.
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JEQuidam
Posts: 210
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 8:45 pm
First Name: Jeff
Stance: Pro-Enlargement
Location: Dunwoody, Georgia
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Re: Resolving Bipolar Politics

Post by JEQuidam »

Mike, your first proposition, that "districts of smaller constituencies hold the individual representatives accountable for their actions regardless of party affiliation", is the fundamental concept that more people need to understand.

And you're 100% correct that "There should be requirements for a high school diploma which include civics and classical economics. ... the people who vote should have an understanding of how their government is designed to work and a basic understanding of math free classical economics." As Abraham Lincoln astutely observed: “The philosophy of the school room in one generation will be the philosophy of government in the next.” The philosophy in the school room has encouraged many people to surrender their individual liberties for the illusory promises of statism.
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